PAL Awareness Month 2017-11-12T14:36:20+00:00

In the world of pregnancy after loss there is a story of hope about a precious new life, and it’s the story of the rainbow baby. It is based on the understanding that the beauty of the rainbow does not negate the ravages of any storm. The clouds may still hover but the rainbow provides hope and promise of new life ahead.

As we trudge out of the darks storms of winter and into spring with the hope of new life blooming, Pregnancy After Loss Support (PALS) is following Minnesota’s lead and proclaiming the month of March as PAL Awareness Month, and March 15th as PAL Awareness Day–a month and day to acknowledge the difficult journey of balancing joy and grief during a subsequent pregnancy after loss.

 

Ways you can participate:

Full Proclamation

In the world of pregnancy after loss there is a story of hope about a precious new life, and it’s the story of the rainbow baby. It is based on the understanding that the beauty of the rainbow does not negate the ravages of any storm. The clouds may still hover but the rainbow provides hope and promise of new life ahead.

As we trudge out of the darks storms of winter and into spring with the hope of new life blooming, Pregnancy After Loss Support (PALS) is following Minnesota’s lead and proclaiming the month of March as PAL Awareness Month, and March 15th as PAL Awareness Day–a month and day to acknowledge the difficult journey of balancing joy and grief during a subsequent pregnancy after loss.

In 2012, Mark Dayton, Governor of Minnesota, proclaimed March as Pregnancy After Loss Awareness Month. In 2015, PALS is committed to spreading pregnancy after loss awareness worldwide. We encourage you to join us throughout the month, and specifically on March 15th, as we spread awareness about the courageous struggle of the mom pregnant again after a loss.

Whereas: In the United States, 1 out of every 4 pregnancies ends in miscarriage and 1 and every 160 pregnancies end in stillbirth. These numbers do not include infant death from preterm labor, diagnosis of life-limiting conditions, or SIDS.

A subsequent pregnancy is common for these women with in the first year following a loss.

Whereas: Education through awareness can promote health during subsequent pregnancies and help ensure safe and health deliveries.

Whereas: Recognition of Pregnancy After Loss will enable individuals and communities to further meet the needs of the bereaved mothers, fathers and other members of the family as they continue to grieve and heal, while embracing the gift of new life.

Whereas: Women who are pregnant again after loss are at an increased risk for perinatal and postpartum mood and anxiety disorders, even after having a successful subsequent pregnancy and birth.

Whereas: Women who are pregnant again after a loss report having higher symptoms of anxiety and depression during their subsequent pregnancy, compared to those who have not experienced a previous loss.

Whereas: Between 50-80% of women who experience prenatal loss become pregnant again within 12 – 18 months after their loss.

Whereas: After a pregnancy loss or infant death, many will experience grief, confusion, anxiety, guilt and fear of loss in another pregnancy.

Knowledge that there are resources available and others to turn to for compassion and guidance is an important aspect in the journey of healing during a subsequent pregnancy.

Join us

Join us at PregnancyAfterLossSupport.com, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for more details and events.